Friday, January 14, 2011

Towards Open-Source Buddhism

Towards Open-Source Buddhism

I have a guest post today at the Tricycle blog that uses Linux and open-source computing as a metaphor for the evolution of Western Buddhism. Here are two short excerpts from the post:


What we call Buddhism is a widely distributed network phenomenon designed to optimize the human experience. Like the Internet, it started out as someone's idea, but then spun out of control: no one person or group now owns it, and it is being modified and updated from day to day in millions of little increments, from every corner of the known world.

Where is “the Internet?” It seems to adhere somehow to the computers and networks that are part of it, but the Internet itself can't be found. Where is “Buddhism?” It seems to adhere to the people and networks that are practicing it, but the Buddhism itself can't be found. Yet both the Internet and Buddhism can be demonstrated, utilized, applied in countless ways.

...

In my own practice, I have benefited from [the fusion of different traditions]. Although I study with a Tibetan teacher and look towards the Kagyu school of Tibetan Buddhism as the primary lighthouse by which I navigate the waters, I have at times experienced bubbles of conceptual confusion and intellectualization that were helpfully popped by the sharp concision and no-nonsense directness of Zen teachings. At other times, exposure to the Theravadan view of the stages on the path of awakening—different in many ways from the Mahayana and Vajrayana views—has helped me view the teachings and practices in a more expansive light. I have even deepened my Buddhist path, at times, by incorporating spiritual teachings and practices from outside of Buddhism altogether. As long as I feel firmly rooted in my “native” tradition, I find this sort of cross-fertilization to be fruitful.

I now have to admit, though, that I know less than I once imagined I did what “Western Buddhism” is, or what it may become. It feels sometimes that there are as many “Western Buddhisms” taking shape among us as there are Western Buddhists who practice them. As with the emergence of Linux in the world of computers, perhaps what we are witnessing in the West today, with so much polymorphous blending of traditions, is the emergence of Open-Source Buddhism. (This moniker is, in fact, already in use on numerous websites.) Like the populist software movement from which it borrows its name, Open-Source Buddhism proposes a grassroots, do-it-yourself alternative to the old closed, proprietary operating systems. And it may yet produce new applications that were not possible within the framework of those systems.

However, buyers beware: I have dabbled in Linux, and frankly it gives me a headache....


Check out the full post at Tricycle to see what lessons can be drawn from the emergence of Open-Source Buddhism. Add your comments and join the conversation.

2 comments:

Philosopher Dog said...

It's unclear what open source Buddhism is supposed to mean. Paying by donation is an essential idea that I support, which takes Buddhism out of the commercial realm, where it has no place. However, open source is something produced by numerous people. This, I think, is potentially a path of delusion. I find this mixing of traditions problematic. Better to pick a solid path and follow the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma. The danger with the spiritual sampling view is one of following the Dhamma in line with one's own delusion. Picking and choosing is a recipe for never going deep into a path. This is one of the most common pitfalls I see among my spiritual friends.

marajit said...

It seems more proper to say open-source religion.

Do-it-youself Buddhism has yet to prove itself.